A New Chapter: Council Retreat & Investiture

5 a.m. on the beachfront. Perching precariously on the edge of a jagged rock, I look out across the deep, humming waters and marvel at my own swelling wonderment as it rises and ebbs with the tides. What is it that allows the iridescent turquoise waters to evoke such reverential devotion in us? What is it…

Hidden Hideaways: The Lemontree Bistro

Culinary Appreciation Society. A mention of the club brings amused chuckles and knowing glances- everyone takes it as a barely concealed excuse for spoilt kids with a buck to spend to rack up the CAS points whilst spending time with friends. Oui… Mais non. Finally some bona fide food enclave searching; purveyors of unbeknownst cafés and bistros…

Death of a Salesman, by Arthur Miller

The flaw, or crack in character, is really nothing – and need be nothing – but his inherent unwillingness to remain passive in the face of what he conceives to be a challenge to his dignity, his image of his rightful status. – Arthur Miller, Tragedy of the Common Man. I have fallen in love with…

Piffling Postages

Things have been a bit of a convoluted Christmas-light-esque jumble of tangled wires lately, but suffice to say these few days have been incredibly eventful ones. The past week has been frenetic- from helping out at Open House 2013 (a chaotic jumble of 400 people!) to watching The Importance of Being Earnest, to multiple IAs…

The Importance of Being Earnest, Wild Rice Productions

It is a terrible thing for a man to find out suddenly that all his life he has been speaking nothing but the truth. Can you forgive me? Words cannot begin to describe the stomach-aching, cheek-muscle-straining, giddiness-inducing two hours of utter enjoyment that Wild Rice’s production of Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest brought to the…

Krabi, Thailand: Foodscapade

Seize the moment. Remember all those women on the Titanic who waved off the dessert cart. Life is short; why not eat? Good food is a work of art in itself- and like art, food has a immense history of culture and intense flavors that shape each type of cuisine. Thailand is no exception; perhaps…

Krabi: Escape into idyllic paradise

The throaty rumble of the boat across choppy waters Whooshes to secluded beaches in little splutters Advances towards the blissful haven Isolated; radiant heaven Waves roll gently in, caressing the golden sand Gritty specks, grasped in outstretched hand Blossoming flowers, tucked behind ears Whisper soothing tunes for all to hear There is little hurt blowing…

All My Sons, By Arthur Miller

‘[…] the underlying fear of being displaced, the disaster inherent in being torn away from our chosen image of what or who we are in this world.’- Arthur Miller, Tragedy of the Common Man.  The fear of not being that which you want to be. A pervasive fear; one that everyone falls prey to at one…

Elements of Thought

Throbbing aches Of a newly formed notion Coaxed out of tranquility; Conjured from wispy thin air- Forced to materialize, to be made aware Retaliating Lashing out Coiling spindly fingers throughout Leaving us with no choice but To live in perpetual fetters to inescapable contemplation In transient delusions of liberation Tied to aphoristic observations Significance in…

Nothing Good or Bad, Only Thinking Makes it So

Thought. The throbbing ache of a newly formed notion, coaxed out of the tranquil state of wispy thin air and forced to materialize in the depths of our minds- retaliating; lashing out and coiling its long fingers around our brains, leaving us with no choice but to live in perpetual fetters to its inescapable contemplations……

Lord Turnbull and the ‘Really Inconvenient Reality’

Lord Turnbull came to give a presentation on his ‘Really Inconvenient Truth’ about climate change today, but all I got out of it was the reflection of a ‘Really Inconvenient Reality’. His presence here was showered with prestige, but tainted with an unfair amount of conceit. Not on Lord Turnbull’s part- but rather, the entire…

Menya Musashi, STARamen@StarVista

A typical saturday lunch out at Star Vista would mean jostling crowds, long snaking queues, and a resulting virtually immovable apathy towards simply shuffling forward to find a place to dine. But apparently weekday lunches are the opposite. The church-slash-shopping-mall-because-of-mercenary-pastors-nowadays are all the rage during the weekends, but relatively desolate and abandoned during the week….

Kith Café

There are few things more pleasurable than having a leisurely stroll along the promenade stretching down the Singapore River- it is a place brimming with quaint cafés and exuberant restaurants, perfect for tourists and foodies alike (although, you must admit, sometimes the two come hand in hand). Until you notice the murky waters of the…

Laurent Bernard Chocolatier

Mohamed Sultan Road. A hallowed boulevard cluttered with the occasional quaint café and brunch-with-eggs-and-toast haunt- the kind of place you’d go to sip a petite cap while tapping away furiously on your laptop&iPad. Also, the place to go should you feel any desire to get lost. Because get lost we certainly did. With half an…

What it truly means to be Lasallian

Today I met up with A.S and A. at Laurent Bernard Chocolatier to have a good catching up, and the conversation that we struck up really resounded with the very core of who I am. We talked about Lasallian Leadership Training Camps (in which selected students with ‘leadership potential’ are sent to for an introduction…

Galloping in the Grandstand: Turf City- Omakase; La Benaton; Latte E Miele

A day at the races. Ladies in pristinely white lace dresses adorned with indicate embroidery, swinging their petite parasols to and fro. Men in their black suits and white buttons, curtsying and sweeping their hats off in a flowery motion. Horses racing by, a flurried blur of speckled brown and psychedelic jerseyed riders. A picture…

Crusading with the CAS

Yesterday marked the beginning of a new voyage; a glorified pilgrimage of sorts for dozens of famished foodies that came together to share their love for noshing. That’s right, my first CAS (Culinary Appreciation Society- clever acronym!) outing. We hopped on the bus to Nex (in Serangoon), and arrived there in about a quarter of an…

Idyllic Sundays

Pumps of adrenalin surge through your veins as you cross the short expanse of the tennis court- legs flying over the green surface, breath gasping in short puffs, muscles stiffening in preparation for the impact;– then, all of a sudden, time stops. The ball falls slowly, exaggeratedly towards you as you screech to a stop,…

Perplexingly Puzzling Paradoxes: The Tortoise

I have an riveting problem for you to scratch your head over today, but I have no doubt many of you have come across it before: Achilles and a tortoise were about to race over 100 meters. Achilles was ten times faster than the tortoise, but the tortoise requested only a 10 meter head start…

Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman

Don’t trust your own judgement. Think. At first glance this hefty book may seem like a compilation of daunting concepts and unmoistened bare facts- the book is indeed dry and may come across as an esoteric psychological analysis of a specific area in the cognitive sciences. However, it is reasonably conveyed in layman’s terms- and…

New Beginnings

Ridiculously optimistic about the new year now school has started, albeit off to a crawling one. Did some registration, assemblies, and then ice breaker whatnot. Usually I’m the type to shy away from such games- I take part in them to the fullest of my capacity but I keep my mouth closed lest I show…

In Praise of Idleness, by Bertrand Russell

I made the mistake of bringing this book out with me one day- being seated across people on the bus inevitably means being uncomfortably scrutinized by the brash auntie, the self-righteous uncle, or even the occasional pony-tailed student (albeit more discreetly). The usually surreptitious glances evolved into somewhat tactless gapes and frowns, which confused me-…

New Year, Schnew Yarrr.

New Years, Christmases, birthdays- all these celebrations usually call for a cup of nostalgia and a spoon of melancholy, or else a flaming plate of excitement- but these past few days have been anything but so. Relatively phlegmatic, tranquil, and utterly devoid of lugubrious mournings of lost time. I think I’ve come to accept that…

Freakonomics, by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J.Dubner

The problem with non-fiction books is that they inevitably become outdated one day. No, not even your most basic Math 101 textbooks can withstand the test of time, and are usually swept off the shelves within a few years of publication, woefully lost to some newer, shinier edition with a sleeker cover. However, there are…

Barcelona in Gray Hues: Spain ’11

The shadowy tones of the film; the mysterious blacks hiding under the disguise of alluring whites; the ever-enticing rustic charm- it’s no wonder that black and white film has come back into fashion nowadays. No wonder, that film photography has made its comeback- even with the technological advance that has been so proudly heralded in…

Atlas Shrugged, by Ayn Rand

A colossal tome reflective of Ayn Rand’s literary greatness, her magnum opus- a beautiful volume brimming with burning conviction, fierce challenges to societal values and morals, packaged in a deceivingly modest-looking paperback. Ayn Rand- in her complete appreciation for individuality- pays homage to the driving forces of the world, the men (and women) without whom…

Splendid Illusions on the East Coast: Orlando ’12

Apologies for the delay; I had my second roll of Kodak developed just this last week. I really can’t stop marveling at the vibrant, saturated colors: they’re absolutely brilliant- the white streaks of cloud rippling across the startlingly blue sky- just perfect. Spending 5 days in theme parks was a tiring ordeal, although it was…

Christmas of Frivolity: Frivolité Macarons

So how did I spend my Christmas, you ask? None other than with my trusty, crumb-stained whisk, my caramel-encrusted saucepan, and my warmly endearing Gaggenau oven. I decided to embark on the perfect macaron conquest as with hundreds of other fellow pastry-chef-or-baker wannabes; much to the delight of my friends, much to the horror of my…

Christmas lovin’

People bake for relaxation, but I think it may be quite the opposite for me. I don’t feel quite as relaxed as I do tanning with a strawberry milkshake in the swimming pool. I find baking to be liberating, not relaxing. My thoughts are often hard to control and always spiraling in different directions- and…

It’s Beginning to Feel a Lot Like Christmas

I think apologies are in order for the deluge of book-review posts. I’ve lost quite a few followers in the past week, probably due to the vast number of book reviews that have nothing at all to do with cooking/baking/photography/travel or the rest of the little things I babble about. I suppose that’s the problem…

The Importance of Being Earnest, by Oscar Wilde

I had absolutely no intention of reading another book today (well, in this case, a script), but spending lunch alone inevitably results in excessive munching and extensive reading. It’s no help that the largest book shelf in the house is virtually two steps away from the kitchen, conveniently flaunting its alluring tomes for easy perusing….

Gray Skies, Blue Days- Rainy Adventures in San Francisco

Rain. The soft pitter-patter against the windowsill. The melodic splattering against the ground. The relentless drumming on the rooftop. I love the rain. The tingly touch of it on your tongue, the musty and distinctly earthy smell of the air, the grayish pensive skies. Most days I relish the short spells of heavy rain: it…

The Time Machine, by H.G Wells

The title of this book brings back those fun-filled days spiritedly running through the meadows of blooming creativity and imagination, brimming with childish naivety and a profound love for the new and exciting. That’s right, there’s something charming in the foolish thought of exclusivity in a child’s wanderings- I had, at the raw age of…

Farenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury

I read two brilliant books in the last 24 hours, the first being a wonderfully simple and heartfelt book (which I will review later, it has become my favorite book of all time and hence deserves a second, third, fourth, or dozens of reads before I can review it objectively), and the latter being the…

Time Must Have a Stop, by Aldous Huxley

I picked up this beautifully laminated paperback at Citylights in San Francisco- a rustic and sublimely homely book shop that contains shelves upon shelves of books. If I had the choice I would’ve willingly remained there for the rest of eternity. The comfortingly earthy smell of heavenly tomes blended right in with the roughly cut…

Dazzling Sundance on the West Coast

I love the brilliant shine and highly saturated colors of the Kodak Ektar 100. Pretty much all the photos turned out wonderfully (in the beautiful Nevada and Florida sunshine; San Francisco’s weather did not live up to expectation). Pretty proud of this first roll of Ektar on my grandpa’s Pentax MX, considering that the camera…

Scintillating Lights- Las Vegas

Paris may be the city of lights, but no city trumps Las Vegas when it comes to a display of effulgent neon strobes and glinting headlamps. In fact, one could say that Vegas is the true city of dazzling luminosity. Gliding into Las Vegas in the morning means bright blue skies, sandy majestic rolling hills…

Time lapse

I love traveling. Arrived at San Francisco last night after a long flight (including transits-21 hours), and now I’m currently on a flight to Vegas. Listening to ‘Come Fly With Me’ while looking out over the San Francisco Bay, staring over the altostratus clouds and marveling at the hilly ranges. Pure bliss, I say. We…

The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne

Just finished reading The Scarlet Letter. I’d been looking forward to finishing it (I read three quarters of it during the IGCSE period), but although I found it an intriguing read I can say I was a little disappointed. Not that I thought it wasn’t a good book, on the contrary I thought it was…

Meatloaf Galore

I’m finally getting myself down to document my cooking/baking adventures as well. Seems like this months is the starter for many ‘firsts’, eh? New year, sixteen, new traditions. As mom was out yesterday, the cooking duties fell to me (and I quite willingly took charge of it). A simple meatloaf and the usual bread and…

Those Barren Leaves, by Aldous Huxley

Starting with my first-ever book review on this blog! It seems rather apt to be reviewing this book, as Aldous Huxley is arguably my favorite author of all time-although that’s not much of a feat since I’m unfortunately not as well-read as I would like to be (due to time constraints). Prior to this I’ve…

Sweet 16.

It’s my birthday today! Had an additional maths and chemistry exam today, but today’s unofficially the end of my exams. (Only multiple choice left.) I’ve never really understood what the hype about birthdays was/is about. After all, birthdays do come every year. And if statistics hold any meaning, I technically have 83 of these to…

Myself and I

Me. What am I? Who am I? What defines me? I’m having those moments of doubt again. It’s not that I don’t know who I am, I know where I stand and why I do what I do. I know what I love, what I dislike, and I know my emotions through and through. Nosce…

Technology- beneficial or detrimental?

I was having lunch today and munching away on my sumptuous Mac&Cheese (which, by the way was dripping with oozing cheese and threatening to cause me a premature death by obesity or coronary heart disease). Excuse the sarcasm, I still haven’t forgiven my biology textbook for its ominous premonition that fatty foods=fatty people=death. Anyways, I…

Singapore’s Educational Reform.

Better late than never. Rebalancing the PSLE. Finally, seeing some change. Why didn’t Mr. Tharman suggest this while he was Minister for Education? I wonder. But it doesn’t matter, the crux of the matter is that things are changing, albeit 10 years late. However, I’m not sure if rebalancing the PSLE will change much. Perhaps…

The End Of School As We Know It

Just because schooling is traditionally a teacher in front of the class doesn’t mean it’s the best way. I was intrigued by this article in this copy of the New Scientist (8 Sept) I picked up at our school library. I think we’ve all been unduly bashing the education system and pushing for educational reform…

Spain December 2011

Last winter’s escapade to Spain was one filled with delights, both in gastronomical terms (the food there was simply divine) and in architectural and cultural wonders. I loved Spain. The shopping opportunities and coastal views didn’t hurt, either. This roll was shot with my Diana F+, 120mm film (Can’t remember which type, but I think…

Change.

Deterioration. Change. I have been on a downward spiral lately. Not really, everything is just peachy. Things are looking up and life is pretty amazing. I’ve got to admit, this year has been a relatively good one. I’ve managed to find myself this year, and get back on track in terms of co-curriculars and finally…

Education.

I finally figured out to post my Prezi on wordpress. It requires a little bit of tweaking of the embed code that Prezi offers on its ‘Share’ function, but it’s rather simple and ingenious! Anyways, hope you like the Prezi. It’s very crudely put together, but since it is IGCSE period I couldn’t spare much…

Times Change.

Years have passed.  Please do check in with my new blogs.  I mostly write in journals now, but when i do post, I post on my tumblr.  If you’d like to see a recent project I’ve been working on: The Ideal School System.  If you’re interested in The Lost Island / Time, they were completed…